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Graphene Nanotechnology Vaccine

Graphene Nanotechnology Vaccine

Graphene Nanotechnology Vaccine. WHAT IS GRAPHENE?

Graphene Nanotechnology Vaccine

GRAPHENE IS A NON-METALLIC SUPERCONDUCTIVE MATERIAL THAT IS BETWEEN THE NANOTECHNOLOGICAL AND THE BIOLOGICAL.
IT IS BASED ON CARBON.
IT IS ALMOST TRANSPARENT.
ITS ATOMIC STRUCTURE IS HEXAGONAL.
GRAPHENE CAN BE HANDLED THROUGH RADIO FREQUENCY AND IS MAGNETIZABLE WHEN COMBINING WITH THE HYDROGEN OF THE HUMAN BODY H2O.
WITH GRAPHENE IN THE BRAIN EMOTIONS ARE MODULATED BY RADIO FREQUENCY.
BIOMETRIC PARAMETERS AND GPS POSITION ARE OBTAINED.
OUR DNA IS ALSO MODULATED CAUSING STERILITY AND DISEASE OR SUDDEN DEATH.
AND ABOVE ALL THE MENTAL CONTROL OF THE POPULATION.

mRNA vaccines have never been used on humans before. That, by very definition, is “human experimentation” #NurembergCode: Article 6, Sections 1 and 3

https://thepulse.one/2021/04/01/the-top-four-reasons-why-some-people-doctors-scientists-refuse-to-take-the-covid-vaccine/

https://t.me/QNewsOfficialTV

Graphene Stronger Than Steel

Graphene is 200 times stronger than steel by weight. It is 1,000 times lighter than paper. Flexible. It is 98 percent transparent. It conducts electricity better than any other known material at room temperature. Graphene is comprised of single atom thick layers of carbon.

Is this why some vax’d are having magnets attach to the injection sight? And why some do not seem to be magnetized yet (the graphene has yet to cluster)?

Graphene oxide is detected in the body by specialized cells of the immune system Researchers at Karolinska Institutet, the University of Manchester and Chalmers University of Technology have shown that the human immune system handles graphene oxide in a manner similar to pathogens.

Graphene oxide inside the body causes post inflammatory syndrome or systemic or multi-organ inflammations. 1/2

 

Graphine Dangerous To Humans

Wonder-material graphene could be dangerous to humans and the environment
May 1, 2014 by Loz Blain
I’ve been waiting for some time now to write a headline along the lines of “scientists discover thing that graphene is not amazing at” … and here it is. Everybody’s favorite nanomaterial may have a plethora of near-magical properties, but as it turns out, it could also be bad for the environment – and bad for you, too.

It’s easy to get carried away when you start talking about graphene. Comprised of single atom thick layers of carbon, graphene is incredibly light, incredibly strong, extremely flexible and highly conductive both of heat and electricity. Its properties hold the promise of outright technological revolution in so many fields that it has been called a wonder material.
But it’s only been 10 years since graphene was first isolated in the laboratory, and as researchers and industries scramble to bring graphene out of the lab and into a vast range of commercial applications, far less money is being spent examining its potential negative effects.

Two recent studies give us a less than rosy angle. In the first, a team of biologists, engineers and material scientists at Brown University examined graphene’s potential toxicity in human cells. They found that the jagged edges of graphene nanoparticles, super sharp and super strong, easily pierced through cell membranes in human lung, skin and immune cells, suggesting the potential to do serious damage in humans and other animals.
The bottom corner of a piece of graphene penetrates a cell membrane – mechanical properties like rough edges and sharp corners can make graphene dangerous to human cells. Scale bar represents two microns. (Image: Kane lab/Brown University)
“These materials can be inhaled unintentionally, or they may be intentionally injected or implanted as components of new biomedical technologies,” said Robert Hurt, professor of engineering and one of the study’s authors. “So we want to understand how they interact with cells once inside the body.”
Another study by a team from University of California, Riverside’s Bourns College of Engineering examined how graphene oxide nanoparticles might interact with the environment if they found their way into surface or ground water sources.

The team found that in groundwater sources, where there’s little organic material and the water has a higher degree of hardness, graphene oxide nanoparticles tended to become less stable and would eventually settle out or be removed in sub-surface environments.
Jacob D Lanphere, left, and Corey Luth, work in the lab of their adviser Sharon Walker
But in surface water such as lakes or rivers, where there’s more organic material and less hardness, the particles stayed much more stable and showed a tendency to travel further, particularly under the surface.

So a spill of these kinds of nanoparticles would appear to have the potential to cause harm to organic matter, plants, fish, animals, and humans. The affected area could be quick to spread, and could take some time to become safe again.

“The situation today is similar to where we were with chemicals and pharmaceuticals 30 years ago,” said the paper’s co-author Jacob D. Lanphere. “We just don’t know much about what happens when these engineered nanomaterials get into the ground or water. So we have to be proactive so we have the data available to promote sustainable applications of this technology in the future.”
At this stage, the Material Safety Data Sheet governing the industrial use of graphene is incomplete. It’s listed as a potential irritant of skin and eyes, and potentially hazardous to breathe in or ingest. No information is available on whether it has carcinogenic effects or potential developmental toxicity.

But researchers from the first study point out that this is a material in its infancy, and as a man-made material, there are opportunities at this early stage to examine and understand the potential harmful properties of graphene and try to engineer them out. We’ve got a few years yet before graphene really starts being a big presence in our lives, so the challenge is set to work out how to make it as safe as possible for ourselves and our planet.

The Brown University research was published online in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The UC Riverside paper was published in a special issue of the journal Environmental Engineering Science.
Sources: Brown University, UC Riverside

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